• Hotel Seattle at James St. and Yesler Way, ca. 1903

    Hotel Seattle at James St. and Yesler Way, ca. 1903

    Located in Pioneer Square at the intersection of Yesler Way, James Street and First Avenue, Hotel Seattle (also known as the Seattle Hotel) was constructed in 1890. It replaced the Occidental Hotel which burned down in the fire of 1889. In 1891, the building served as home to the Seattle Public Library. Around the time of the construction of the nearby Smith Tower in 1914, Hotel Seattle was converted from hotel use to an office building. By 1961, the building was abandoned and later torn down and replaced with a parking garage. This instigated a historic preservation movement in the Pioneer Square area to preserve other historic buildings before they could be demolished.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00822

    Date: 1903?

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  • New York Block, ca. 1907

    New York Block, ca. 1907

    The New York Block, constructed between 1890 and 1892, was located at the corner of Cherry Street and Second Avenue.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00230

    Date: 1907

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  • Seattle Country Club, ca. 1907

    Seattle Country Club, ca. 1907

    Location and identity of the country club depicted is unclear. The postcard possibly shows the Seattle Golf Club (then called the Seattle Golf and Country Club) which moved from a location near Gasworks Park to Laurelhurst in 1904. In 1908 the club moved to their current location on Richmond Beach Road and changed their name to Seattle Golf Club.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00568

    Date: 1907?

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  • Unidentified residential street, April 7, 1911

    Unidentified residential street, April 7, 1911

    Image of unknown residential street and houses. Similar postcards from this time period depict Capitol Hill homes.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00603

    Date: 1911-04-07

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  • Seattle waterfront, ca. 1915

    Seattle waterfront, ca. 1915

    Transcribed from front of postcard: "Seaport of Seattle, showing the 42 Story L.C. Smith Building and central portion of Water Front." Transcribed from back of postcard: "42- Story L.C. Smith Building Seattle. Great View from Observation Floor and Balcony."

    Identifier: spl_pc_00211

    Date: 1915?

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  • Smith Tower, ca. 1915

    Smith Tower, ca. 1915

    Transcribed from postcard: "Second Ave and the 42 Story L.C. Smith Bldg. Seattle. U.S.A. Eight elevators-two serving the tower. Six hundred Offices. Six stores. Telegraph office on first Floor. Barber Shop, Restaurant, Buffet in Basement, Thirty-fifth Floor furnished in Washington."

    Identifier: spl_pc_00216

    Date: 1915?

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  • Perry Apartments, ca. 1909

    Perry Apartments, ca. 1909

    Located at Madison Street and Boren Avenue, the Perry Hotel, also known as the Perry Apartments, was built in 1907. In 1916, the building was renovated to become the Columbus Sanitarium and renamed once again to Cabrini Hospital in the 1960s. The building was demolished in 1996.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00806

    Date: 1909

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  • 4th Ave. and University St., ca. 1915

    4th Ave. and University St., ca. 1915

    Nowell, Frank H., 1864-1950

    The White-Henry-Stuart Building (constructed 1908-1915 and demolished in 1974) appears on the right and the Cobb Building (completed in 1910) appears on the left.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00203

    Date: 1915?

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  • Union Station, ca. 1911

    Union Station, ca. 1911

    Transcribed from postcard: "This new depot is 145 x 185 fet. and cost, with its switching yards, $1,000,000 for construction. It is the most northern "out post" of the Harriman system of 13,000 miles of railroads, the greatest in the world." During the early 1900's, there was increasing interest in connecting railroads with Seattle. The high demand and competition between railways resulted in two railway stations being built directly next to each other at 4th Avenue and Jackson Street. King Street Station was constructed in 1906 and can be distinguished by its tower. Union Station (which is depicted in this postcard) was constructed in 1911 and originally known as the Oregon and Washington Station. (Alternative names for Union Station include the Union Depot and the Northern Pacific Great Northern Depot.) The back of this postcard describes the station as "This new depot is 145x185 ft. and cost, with its switching yards, $1,000,000 for construction. It is the most northern "out post" of the Harriman system of 13,000 miles of railroads, the greatest in the world." For a good example of the differences between Union Station and King Street Station see spl_pc_01011 where Union Station appears in the foreground and King Street Station appears in the background.

    Identifier: spl_pc_01010

    Date: 1911

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  • Federal Building at 3rd Ave. and Union St., ca. 1910

    Federal Building at 3rd Ave. and Union St., ca. 1910

    Nowell, Frank H., 1864-1950

    Street view of the Federal Building in downtown Seattle with the White-Henry-Stuart Building and the Pantages Theatre in the background. Construction on the Federal Building (also known as the U.S. Court House, Custom House and Post Office) began in 1903 and ended in 1908. The building was located at the intersection of Union Street and Third Avenue, which was being regraded at the time. The Third Avenue regrade left a gap of four feet down to the new sidewalk which resulted in a new set of stairs being added to the building's exterior. The building was demolished in 1958.

    Identifier: spl_pc_00413

    Date: 1910?

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