• U.S. Science Pavilion; Ankle deep mud is after rain feature

    U.S. Science Pavilion; Ankle deep mud is after rain feature

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    United States Science Pavilion, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). “The lacy pattern of this six-unit complex placed around a central court with its 100-ft. high arches is in decided contrast to the forcefulness of Coliseum 21. In a sense, the pavilion is a salute to concrete, for it is believed to represent the largest single use of precast and prestressed structural components in the nation.” (An Architect’s Guidebook to the Seattle World’s Fair. Seattle, Pacific Builder and Engineer, April 1962, p. 21)

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_01632

    Date: 1962-02-13

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  • View N.E. of Commerce Pavilion

    View N.E. of Commerce Pavilion

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Interiors, Fashion, and Commerce Pavilion of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). <br><br> “Architecturally speaking, this exhibit building appears to be a candidate as one of the most successful on the fairgrounds. It is far from being spectacular, but as an understatement fulfills several objectives. <br><br> “First and foremost, the structure in its simple form and neutral color scheme (white and shades of gray)provides an appropriate backdrop for the fashions, fabrics and other displays it will house, rather than competes with them. The long horizontal lines create an effective foil for the sharp vertical of the adjacent Space Needle; and the roof, in particular, helps to contain a triangular area which is rather disorganized in its plan. The sloping site permits three ceiling gradients by dropping the floor levels. <br><br> “Precast concrete columns support prebuilt steel joists and girders. Cement stucco containing selected chips from an eastern Washington quarry make up the fascia and walls. The poured-in-place concrete bulkhead gets its pattern from the wood inserts used in the forming and provides the contraction jointing.” (An Architect’s Guidebook to the Seattle World’s Fair. Seattle, Pacific Builder and Engineer, April 1962, p. 31)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00155

    Date: 1962-09

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  • View N.E. in Show Str. N.E. corner of fairground

    View N.E. in Show Str. N.E. corner of fairground

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Show Street was the "adult entertainment" section of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair)."With a thought that a sample of the best of everything belongs at a World's Fair, the northeast corner of the Fairgrounds is devoted to adult entertainment. This area is called Show Street U.S.A. Show Street offers food and drink, exciting show girls, the natural and the unusual. It's a great place to spend an evening…GRACIE HANSEN’S PARADISE INTERNATIONAL -- A lush dinner club featuring a Las Vegas type show put together by Barry Ashton. The entire operation is labeled ‘excellent’ by everyone who goes there.” (Official press book : Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Century 21 Exposition, p. 60.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00865

    Date: 1962-04-21

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  • Oregon State Pavilion; interior view

    Oregon State Pavilion; interior view

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    "The Boulevards of the World area is the shopping center of the fair. Stores, stands and kiosks displaying the goods and gifts of a dozen nations line the gay and colorful thoroughfares that tie the five theme Worlds of Century 21 together." (Official Guide Book, Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Acme Publications. p. 119.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00750

    Date: 1962-07

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  • Past & Present

    Past & Present

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Space Needle, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). “The Space Needle, a modernistic totem of the Seattle World’s Fair, was conceived by Eddie Carlson as a doodle in 1959 and given form by architects John Graham Jr., Victor Steinbrueck, and John Ridley. When King County declined to fund the project, five private investors, Bagley Wright, Ned Skinner, Norton Clapp, John Graham Jr., and Howard S. Wright, took over and built the 605-foot tower in less than a year.” (Walt Crowley, “Space Needle (Seattle).” HistoryLink.org, http://historylink.org/index.cfm?DisplayPage=output.cfm&file_id=1424)

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_01654

    Date: 1961-09-29

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  • Sweden Pavilion; Gun from warship Vasa sunk Aug. 10, 1628 in Stockholm harbor

    Sweden Pavilion; Gun from warship Vasa sunk Aug. 10, 1628 in Stockholm harbor

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Sweden Pavilion, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). “Sweden’s three main products, steel, wood and glass are shown throughout the pavilion with a special 2 1/2 ton glass wall and a modern wood relief as two of the main displays. Also shown are relics of the VASA, a 17th century Swedish man-of-war that sunk on its maiden voyage and was only raised last year. Visitors can see many Swedish handicrafts. Mr. Reisbeck, Manager” (Official press book: Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Century 21 Exposition, 1962, p. 37)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00968

    Date: 1962-09

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  • View west to central Information Pavilion [i.e. General Insurance Company Information Center]

    View west to central Information Pavilion [i.e. General Insurance Company Information Center]

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Landscaping, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). “Landscape architects have praised the Seattle World's Fair, as it is unique among international expositions. For the first time, landscape design is permanent, remaining in the Seattle Center after the Fair…More than 15,000 flowering annuals give color and texture, beginning with daffodils and tulips, going through snapdragons, china asters, dahlias (the Fair flower, although there is also a Century 21 rose), begonias (5,000 donated by the Dutch government), and early and late chrysanthemums.” (Official press book : Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Century 21 Exposition, p. 71.) General Insurance Company Information Center, designed by Austin Associates, is visible in background.

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00672

    Date: 1962-09

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  • After fair removal; view from Danish rest. to Sweden Pa

    After fair removal; view from Danish rest. to Sweden Pa

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Demolition of Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). "Surrounding the Coliseum is 94,200 sq. ft. of exhibit space in clear span structures of concrete columns and tilt-up walls with a steel joist roof system and metal decking and insulation. The concrete, laid out in a repetitive form which has become the architect's trademark, relieves what might otherwise have become a monotonous perimeter facade." (An Architect's Guidebook to the Seattle Worlds Fair. Seattle, Pacific Builder and Engineer, April 1962, p. 19)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00369

    Date: 1962-10-24

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  • Bronze plaque on new Shrine bldg. 3rd Ave. No. near Thomas

    Bronze plaque on new Shrine bldg. 3rd Ave. No. near Thomas

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Nile Temple of the Shrine, on the grounds of the future Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). “In 1953…the Nile Temple of the Shrine, a Masonic social and charitable organization,…built a new headquarters building…at the corner of Third Avenue North and Thomas Street. The Nile Temple chose the site in order to permit uniformed units to dress in the Nile Building and then march to the nearby Civic Auditorium for Shrine ceremonials twice a year…The Nile Temple Building was converted for use as the Century 21 Club, a membership organization formed especially for the fair, which offered lounge, dining room, and other club facilities. The $250 membership fee provided a permanent gate pass along with club facilities for the six-month duration of the fair. A vacant space at the front of the building was used to construct a temporary structure, which would house the Christian Witness Pavilion & Child Care Center.” (Cathy Wickwire, Survey Report: Comprehensive Inventory of City-Owned Historic Resources, Seattle, Washington, 2001, pp. 19-22.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_01140

    Date: 1957-10

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  • 300 block Warren Ave. Eastside; View N.E.

    300 block Warren Ave. Eastside; View N.E.

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Future site of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). In 1956, the City of Seattle’s Civic Center Advisory Committee selected land surrounding the existing Civic Auditorium at the foot of Queen Anne Hill for the site of the Century 21 Exposition and a future Civic Center for the city. In 1957, the city acquired the property through condemnation. With a few exceptions, including the Civic Auditorium (which was transformed into the Opera House) and the National Guard Armory (which became the Food Circus), most existing buildings were demolished. This set of photos documents the site before demolition began.

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_00230

    Date: 1957-10

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