• Interiors pavilion; Northwest Designers & Craftsmen; clay relief on wood Betty Feves

    Interiors pavilion; Northwest Designers & Craftsmen; clay relief on wood Betty Feves

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Northwest Designer Craftsmen exhibit within the Interiors Pavilion of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). "Reflecting new design trends in home furnishings materials, this pavilion includes 32 display booths co-sponsored by the American Institute of Interior Designers and its Resource Council." (Official press book : Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Century 21 Exposition, p. 44.) Betty Feves (1918-1985) was a Pendleton, Oregon ceramic sculptor and music educator. Her sculptures often incorporated volcanic ash from Eastern Oregon in their glazes. She was the first recipient of an Oregon Governors Art Award in 1977. (The Oregonian, February 2, 1985, p. C2.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00396

    Date: 1962-10

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  • 621 Nob Hill; Porch decorative motif

    621 Nob Hill; Porch decorative motif

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Future site of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). In 1956, the City of Seattle’s Civic Center Advisory Committee selected land surrounding the existing Civic Auditorium at the foot of Queen Anne Hill for the site of the Century 21 Exposition and a future Civic Center for the city. In 1957, the city acquired the property through condemnation. With a few exceptions, including the Civic Auditorium (which was transformed into the Opera House) and the National Guard Armory (which became the Food Circus), most existing buildings were demolished. This set of photos documents the site before demolition began.

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_00257

    Date: 1957

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  • View East with Monorail station to left; 110.000 fair attendance day; 4 P.M.

    View East with Monorail station to left; 110.000 fair attendance day; 4 P.M.

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Aerial view of Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). “World’s Fair attendance, like a flaming skyrocket, zoomed to a new record yesterday. By 10 o’clock, the total was 114,104. The old mark was 106,860, set September 15. The fair’s new admissions policy--$1 after 6 o’clock instead of the regular $2--was credited with pulling in the evening crowd.” (Stanton H. Patty, Seattle Times, October 7, 1962.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00329

    Date: 1962-10-06

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  • Washington State theme exhibit interior in Coliseum

    Washington State theme exhibit interior in Coliseum

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Washington State Theme Exhibit, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). “Rising in the center of the Coliseum, the ‘World of Tomorrow’ exhibit symbolizes the 21st century -- just beyond man’s reach yet within his range of vision. The theme of this structure of interlocking aluminum cubes, ‘The Threshold and the Threat,’ depicts the ambivalence of atomic power, to be employed either for the advancement or the annihilation of man and his planet. Visitors ascend to the overhead exhibit in a globe-shaped elevator, the ‘Bubbleator,’ for a 21-minute tour of the future, which includes a look at the city of tomorrow, the home of the future, and transportation, industry, food production, education, communications and recreation in the 21st century…The ‘World of Tomorrow’ exhibit was designed by the Donald Deskey Associates of New York and installed by the Radio Corporation of America. The State of Washington sponsored and financed the exhibit.” (Official press book: Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Century 21 Exposition, 1962, pp. 31-32.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_01100

    Date: 1962-10-07

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  • View S.E. from Berlin Pavilion N.W. corner of fairground

    View S.E. from Berlin Pavilion N.W. corner of fairground

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Berlin Pavilion on the International Mall of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). “The story of a divided Berlin is told to visitors through a network of four movie projectors that keep a film constantly in operation, an illuminated map, earphones through which visitors may hear a message in English from Mayor Willy Brandt, and eight panels containing photographs of the history of the city. Gerhard Zimmerman, Director” (Official press book: Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Century 21 Exposition, 1962, p. 35)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00236

    Date: 1962-04-28

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  • U.S. Science Pavilion interior

    U.S. Science Pavilion interior

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    United States Science Pavilion, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). “Beneath five arching towers representing man’s constant striving for knowledge for the universe will be presented the most significant scientific display ever assembled…It is the United States Government’s Science Exhibit, a $9,000,000 program of participation including a giant six-building pavilion and unique exhibits dedicated to showing the peaceful uses of science. Stepping out of the textbook into the techniques of showmanship will be the authentic story of the tremendous break-throughs in the barriers which now stand between man and his conquering of space, his control of weather, disease, and over-population of the world.” (Washington State Dept. of Commerce and Economic Development. Seattle World's Fair preview. Seattle: Acme Publications, 1961, n.p.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00850

    Date: 1962-10

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  • Food Circus interior

    Food Circus interior

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Food Circus, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle Worlds Fair). "Close to the center of the fairgrounds is the Food Circus, a great bustling eaters' delight. Ranged about the vast floor are 52 concessions, all producing food in its manifold phases." (Official Guide Book, Seattle World's Fair 1962. Seattle: Acme Publications. p. 137.) The building was constructed in 1938 as the Washington National Guard Armory (Architects: Floyd A. Naramore and Arrigo M. Young) and was transformed into the Food Circus for the Century 21 Exposition (Architects: Durham, Anderson, and Freed).

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00427

    Date: 1962-10

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  • N.W. from Civic Auditorium; Mercer & Nob Hill Ave.

    N.W. from Civic Auditorium; Mercer & Nob Hill Ave.

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Future site of the Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World’s Fair). In 1956, the City of Seattle’s Civic Center Advisory Committee selected land surrounding the existing Civic Auditorium at the foot of Queen Anne Hill for the site of the Century 21 Exposition and a future Civic Center for the city. In 1957, the city acquired the property through condemnation. With a few exceptions, including the Civic Auditorium (which was transformed into the Opera House) and the National Guard Armory (which became the Food Circus), most existing buildings were demolished. This set of photos documents the site before demolition began.

    Identifier: spl_wl_sec_00288

    Date: 1957-10

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  • View south from exit of European Community Market Pavilion

    View south from exit of European Community Market Pavilion

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    View toward Washignton State Coliseum from European Economic Community Pavilion, after close of Century 21 Exposition (Seattle World's Fair). "Surrounding the Coliseum is 94,200 sq. ft. of exhibit space in clear span structures of concrete columns and tilt-up walls with a steel joist roof system and metal decking and insulation. The concrete, laid out in a repetitive form which has become the architect's trademark, relieves what might otherwise have become a monotonous perimeter facade." (An Architect's Guidebook to the Seattle Worlds Fair. Seattle, Pacific Builder and Engineer, April 1962, p. 19)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00381

    Date: 1962-09-03

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  • Decorative detail on Belgian Waffle House

    Decorative detail on Belgian Waffle House

    Lenggenhager, Werner W., 1899-1988

    Belgian Waffle House (Gaufres de Bruxelles), Century 21 Exposition (Seattle Worlds Fair). "Belgian waffles are famous for being widely introduced at a worlds fair, and most reference books say that it was the 1964-1965 New York Worlds Fair. They are wrong. The tasty treats were a hit first in Seattle. The New York version was a lighter waffle and is better known today, but the Belgian Waffle House was a popular spot with the Seattle crowds." (Bill Cotter, Seattle's 1962 World's Fair. 2010: Arcadia Publishing, p. 101.)

    Identifier: spl_wl_exp_00445

    Date: 1962-10

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