• Letter from Carlson & Borrough, Inc. to Arthur Goodwin with their bid for replacing lights, November 17, 1927

    Letter from Carlson & Borrough, Inc. to Arthur Goodwin with their bid for replacing lights, November 17, 1927

    Carlson & Borrough, Inc.

    Letter from Carlson & Borrough, Inc. regarding the cost of installation for lights above farmers stalls in Pike Place Market.

    Identifier: spl_sh_00042

    Date: 1927-11-17

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  • Aerial photograph of Pike Place Market looking north

    Aerial photograph of Pike Place Market looking north

    Mandeville and Berge, Architects & Engineers

    Aerial photograph of Pike Place Market facing north. The viaduct and waterfront piers can be seen on the left side of the photo.

    Identifier: spl_sh_00011

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  • Letter from Arthur Goodwin to William Crowley regarding the Tacoma Public Market, February 19, 1927

    Letter from Arthur Goodwin to William Crowley regarding the Tacoma Public Market, February 19, 1927

    Goodwin, Arthur

    Letter from Arthur Goodwin to William Crowley thanking him for his interest in his newly constructed Tacoma Public Market. Goodwin invites Crowley to the opening of the market and expresses his hopes that his own book on public markets will soon be published.

    Identifier: spl_sh_00046

    Date: 1927-02-19

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  • 'Let's Keep the Market' anniversary edition of The Weekly, 1981

    'Let's Keep the Market' anniversary edition of The Weekly, 1981

    Brewster, Joyce Skaggs

    Special issue of The Weekly celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Market Initiative. Features include 'The Battle of the Market, 1965-1971,' 'Mark Tobey's Market' and 'Schedule of Anniversary Events.'

    Identifier: spl_ps_001

    Date: 1981-09-23

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  • Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, November 4, 1949

    Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, November 4, 1949

    Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952

    Letter from Edward Curtis to Harriet Leitch describing his progress on "The Lure of Gold." He notes that publishing firm has expressed interest in publishing the work but he had to let them know it would be at least two years before he would be able to complete it. Curtis writes "For one of my age, that's looking far ahead."

    Identifier: spl_esc_014

    Date: 1949-11-04

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  • Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, July 11, 1949

    Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, July 11, 1949

    Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952

    Letter from Edward Curtis to Harriet Leitch, apologizing for his slow response and explaining he is deep in his work on "The Lure of Gold." He writes that the size of the project is overwhelming and he is ""praying that I will live long enough to finish the job." Curtis discusses his climbs of Mount Rainier and his friendship with Ella McBride. He notes that she was one of the few women to summit the mountain unassisted and describes her as "my star helper" both in climbs of Mount Rainier and later, as an assistant in his photography studio. He writes that she lived with the Curtis family and was like a second mother to his daughters.

    Identifier: spl_esc_012

    Date: 1949-07-11

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  • Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, November 17, 1950

    Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, November 17, 1950

    Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952

    Letter from Edward Curtis to Harriet Leitch, discussing his journey with Ella McBride and the Mazamas to the summit of Mount Rainier. He shares that it was on a similar guided tour of Rainier that he met the men who would later invite him to join the Harriman Expedition to Alaska as the photographer. Curtis encourages Leitch to review the volumes describing the Expedition so that she may see the photographs he took of the journey. He adds that his daughter Billy has been forced to return from Australia prematurely due to the sudden ill health of her husband.

    Identifier: spl_esc_018

    Date: 1950-11-17

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  • Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, December 29, 1950

    Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, December 29, 1950

    Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952

    Letter from Edward Curtis to Harriet Leitch repeating some of the news shared in his letter of December 17, 1950. He discusses his poor health leading to the necessary step of stopping his work on "The Lure of Gold" before moving on to recounting the Christmas holiday. He adds that he has decided to have a new picture taken of himself on his 83rd birthday to replace the one taken many decades ago that was used to promote "The North American Indian." Curtis writes "I hope you will be pleased with the Birth Day picture. Knowing my age you may be surprised."

    Identifier: spl_esc_020

    Date: 1950-12-29

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  • Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, circa March 1949

    Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, circa March 1949

    Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952

    Note from Edward Curtis to Harriet Leitch responding to her questions about how long he lived in Seattle and how he began taking pictures of Native Americans. In response to the question "How did you get the confidence of the Indians?" Curtis writes "I said we, not you. In other words, I worked with them not at them."

    Identifier: spl_esc_010

    Date: 1949-03

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  • Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, September 22, 1950

    Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, September 22, 1950

    Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952

    Letter from Edward Curtis to Harriet Leitch in which he briefly touches on discussing "The Lure of Gold" before moving on to talk about the financial difficulties he experienced while producing "The North American Indian." He writes "[...] once upon a time I was confronted with the North American Indian quota which was 1,800,000 plus. I have always thought that ignorance alone allowed me to tackle that task?" Curtis also touches on his continued struggles with arthritis and shares that his youngest daughter, Billy, has recently moved to Australia with her husband. He says he has encouraged Billy to keep notes on the journey in hopes that she can one day use her talents as a writer to compile a book on the subject. Curtis ends with the story of when he helped to bury Chief Joseph, writing "In order to bury him the second time we had to dig him up: I did most of the digging. It was a very hot day and the Noble Red Men said "let the white men do the digging they know how.""

    Identifier: spl_esc_017

    Date: 1950-09-22

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