• Crying in H Mart: A Memoir

    Crying in H Mart: A Memoir

    Zauner, Michelle

    Zauner, of indie band Japanese Breakfast, presents a memoir about growing up Korean-American, losing her mother, and forging her own identity. She tells of growing up the only Asian-American kid at her school in Eugene, Oregon; of struggling with her mother's high expectations of her; of a painful adolescence; of treasured months spent in her grandmother's tiny apartment in Seoul, where she and her mother would bond over heaping plates of food. As she grew up, her Koreanness began to feel ever more distant, even as she found the life she wanted to live. Her mother's diagnosis of terminal pancreatic cancer when Michelle was twenty-five forced a reckoning with her identity and brought her to reclaim the gifts of taste, language, and history her mother had given her.

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  • Secret Seattle: An Illustrated Guide to the City's Offbeat and Overlooked History

    Secret Seattle: An Illustrated Guide to the City's Offbeat and Overlooked History

    Ryan, Susanna

    "Cartoonist and creator of "Seattle Walk Report" Susanna Ryan strolls on with a quirky new illustrated guide celebrating Seattle's everyday outdoor wonders. In Secret Seattle, Ryan explores the weird and wonderful hidden history behind some of the city's most overlooked places, architecture, and infrastructure, from coal chutes in Capitol Hill, to the last remainder of Seattle's original Chinatown in Pioneer Square, to where you can find century-old sidewalks. Discover pocket parks, beautiful boulevards, and great public gardens while learning offbeat facts that will make you see the Emerald City in a whole new way"--

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  • Braiding Sweetgrass

    Braiding Sweetgrass

    Kimmerer, Robin Wall

    "An inspired weaving of indigenous knowledge, plant science, and personal narrative from a distinguished professor of science and a Native American whose previous book, Gathering Moss, was awarded the John Burroughs Medal for outstanding nature writing. As a botanist and professor of plant ecology, Robin Wall Kimmerer has spent a career learning how to ask questions of nature using the tools of science. As a Potawatomi woman, she learned from elders, family, and history that the Potawatomi, as well as a majority of other cultures indigenous to this land, consider plants and animals to be our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowing together to reveal what it means to see humans as "the younger brothers of creation." As she explores these themes she circles toward a central argument: the awakening of a wider ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgement and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the world. Once we begin to listen for the languages of other beings, we can begin to understand the innumerable life-giving gifts the world provides us and learn to offer our thanks, our care, and our own gifts in return"--

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  • This Is your Mind on Plants

    This Is your Mind on Plants

    Pollan, Michael

    "From the #1 New York Times bestselling author Michael Pollan, a radical challenge to how we think about drugs, and an exploration into the powerful human attraction to psychoactive plants -- and the equally powerful taboos Of all the things humans rely on plants for--sustenance, beauty, fragrance, flavor, fiber--surely the most curious is our use of them is to change consciousness: to stimulate or calm, fiddle with or completely alter, the qualities of our mental experience. Take coffee and tea: people around the world rely on caffeine to sharpen their minds. We don't usually think of caffeine as a drug, or our daily use as an addiction, because it is legal and socially acceptable. So then what is a "drug?" And why, for example, is making tea from the leaves of a tea plant acceptable, but making tea from a seed head of an opium poppy a federal crime? In THIS IS YOUR MIND ON PLANTS, Michael Pollan dives deep into three plant drugs -- opium, caffeine, and mescaline -- and throws the fundamental strangeness, and arbitrariness, of our thinking about them into sharp relief. Exploring and participating in the cultures that have grown up around these drugs, while consuming (or in the case of caffeine, trying not to consume) them, Pollan reckons with the powerful human attraction to psychoactive plants, and the equally powerful taboos with which we surround them. Why do we go to such great lengths to seek these shifts in consciousness, and then why do we fence that universal desire with laws and customs and such fraught feelings? A unique blend of history, science, memoir, as well as participatory journalism, Pollan examines and experiences these plants from several very different angles and contexts, and shines a fresh light on a subject that is all too often treated reductively -- as a drug, whether licit or illicit. But that's one of the least interesting things you can say about these plants, Pollan shows, for when we take them into our bodies and let them change our minds, we are engaging with nature in one of the most profound ways we can. Based in part on an essay written more than 25 years ago, this groundbreaking and singular consideration of psychoactive plants, and our attraction to them through time, holds up a mirror to our fundamental human needs and aspirations, the operations of our minds, and our entanglement with the natural world"--

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  • Facing the Mountain: A True Story of Japanese American Heroes in World War II

    Facing the Mountain: A True Story of Japanese American Heroes in World War II

    Brown, Daniel James

    "From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Boys in the Boat, a gripping World War II saga of patriotism and courage: the special Japanese-American Army unit that overcame brutal odds in Europe; their families, incarcerated in camps back home; and a young man who refused to surrender his constitutional rights, even if it meant imprisonment. They came from across the continent and Hawaii. Their parents taught them to embrace both their Japanese heritage and the ways of their American homeland. They faced bigotry, yet they believed in their bright futures as American citizens. But within days of Pearl Harbor, the FBI was ransacking their houses and locking up their fathers. Within months many would themselves be living in internment camps. Facing the Mountain is an unforgettable chronicle of war-time America and the battlefields of Europe. Based on Daniel James Brown's extensive interviews with the families of the protagonists as well as deep archival research, it portrays the kaleidoscopic journey of four Japanese-American families and their sons, who volunteered for 442nd Regimental Combat Team and were deployed to France, Germany, and Italy, where they were asked to do the near impossible. But this is more than a war story. Brown also tells the story of these soldiers' parents, immigrants who were forced to shutter the businesses, surrender their homes, and submit to life in concentration camps on U.S. soil. Woven throughout is the chronicle of a brave young man, one of a cadre of patriotic resisters who stood up against their government in defense of their own rights. Whether fighting on battlefields or in courtrooms, these were Americans under unprecedented strain, doing what Americans do best--striving, resisting, pushing back, rising up, standing on principle, laying down their lives, and enduring"--

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  • I Alone Can Fix It: Donald J. Trump's Catastrophic Final Year

    I Alone Can Fix It: Donald J. Trump's Catastrophic Final Year

    Leonnig, Carol

    "The true story of what took place in Donald Trump's White House during a disastrous 2020 has never before been told in full. What was really going on around the president, as the government failed to contain the coronavirus and over half a million Americans perished? Who was influencing Trump after he refused to concede an election he had clearly lost and spread lies about election fraud? To answer these questions, Phil Rucker and Carol Leonnig reveal a dysfunctional and bumbling presidency's inner workings in unprecedented, stunning detail"--

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  • Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest

    Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest

    Simard, S.

    "A personal and scientific work on trees, forests, and the author's profound discoveries of tree communication"--

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  • The Premonition: A Pandemic Story

    The Premonition: A Pandemic Story

    Lewis, Michael

    "For those who could read between the lines, the censored news out of China was terrifying. But the president insisted there was nothing to worry about. Fortunately, we are still a nation of skeptics. Fortunately, there are those among us who study pandemics and are willing to look unflinchingly at worst-case scenarios. Michael Lewis's ... nonfiction thriller pits a band of medical visionaries against the wall of ignorance that was the official response of the Trump administration to the outbreak of COVID-19"--Dust jacket flap.

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  • The Weekday Vegetarians

    The Weekday Vegetarians

    Rosenstrach, Jenny

    "You don't need to be a vegetarian to eat like one! With over 100 recipes, the New York Times bestselling author of Dinner: A Love Story and her family adopt a "weekday vegetarian" mentality. In her newest cookbook, creator of the beloved website Dinner: A Love Story and Cup of Jo columnist Jenny Rosenstrach writes about being a "weekday vegetarian," i.e. eating a vegetable-based diet during the week and saving meaty splurges for the weekend. One day, it hit Rosenstrach like a lightning bolt: She and her family needed to eat less meat--for their health and for the greater good of the environment. The Weekday Vegetarians shows readers how she got her family on board with meat-free meals. She uses "Hooks" that make any vegetarian dish irresistible--like spiced Crispy Chickpeas, Pizza Dough Croutons, and Sweet Chili Glaze; "Next-Level Sauces" like Vegan Caesar, Shakedown Pesto, and Yogurt-Harissa; and "Side Dishes That Make Everything Special" like Yogurt Flatbread. Organized by meal type, The Weekday Vegetarians offers one hundred recipes like Pizza Salad with White Beans in the Bowls & Salads chapter, Cauliflower Cutlets with Ranch Dressing in the chapter Skillet Mains, and Squash and Black Bean Tacos in the Tacos & Tortillas chapter, with excellent and practical tips, and food for thought written in her engaging, witty, and relatable voice. And who knows--maybe like Jenny's family, the more you practice being "weekday vegetarians," the more you will notice plant-based eating creeping into your weekends!"--

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  • Somebody's Daughter: A Memoir

    Somebody's Daughter: A Memoir

    Ford, Ashley C.

    "One of the most prominent voices of her generation debuts with an extraordinarily powerful memoir: the story of a childhood defined by the ever looming absence of her incarcerated father and the path we must take to both honor and overcome our origins. For as long as she could remember, Ashley has put her father on a pedestal. Despite having only vague memories of seeing him face-to-face, she believes he's the only person in the entire world who understands her. She thinks she understands him too. He's sensitive like her, an artist, and maybe even just as afraid of the dark. She's certain that one day they'll be reunited again, and she'll finally feel complete. There are just a few problems: he's in prison, and she doesn't know what he did to end up there. Through poverty, puberty, and a fraught relationship with her mother, Ashley returns to her image of her father for hope and encouragement. She doesn't know how to deal with the incessant worries that keep her up at night, or how to handle the changes in her body that draw unwanted attention from men. In her search for unconditional love, Ashley begins dating a boy her mother hates; when the relationship turns sour, he assaults her. Still reeling from the rape, which she keeps secret from her family, Ashley finally finds out why her father is in prison. And that's where the story really begins. Somebody's Daughter steps into the world of growing up a poor Black girl, exploring how isolating and complex such a childhood can be. As Ashley battles her body and her environment, she provides a poignant coming-of-age recollection that speaks to finding the threads between who you are and what you were born into, and the complicated familial love that often binds them. "Ashley Ford's prose is glass-so clear, sharp and smooth that the reader sees, in vivid focus, her complicated childhood, brilliant mind, and golden heart. The gravity and urgency of Somebody's Daughter anchored me to my chair and slowed my heartbeat-like no book has since Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye. Ashley Ford is a writer for the ages, and Somebody's Daughter will be a book of the year." -- Glennon Doyle, author of #1 New York Times bestseller Untamed and founder of Together Rising"-- (9/17/2021 8:42:46 PM)

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