• Bullies: A Friendship

    Bullies: A Friendship

    Abramovich, Alex

    "The powerful account of one writer's unlikely friendship with his childhood bully, now the president of a motorcycle club in one of America's most dangerous cities. Once upon a time, Alex Abramovich and Trevor Latham were mortal enemies: miniature outlaws in a Long Island elementary school, perpetually at each other's throats. Then they lost track of each other. Decades later, when they met again, Abramovich was a writer and Latham had become president of the East Bay Rats, a motorcycle club in Oakland. In 2010, Abramovich moved to California to immerse himself in Latham's world--one of fight clubs, booze-filled nights, and beat-downs on the city's streets. But dangerous, dysfunctional Oakland was also becoming one of America's most rapidly gentrifying cities, and the questions Abramovich had arrived with were thrown into brutal relief: How do we live with the burden of violence? How do we overcome it? Do we overcome it? As Trevor, the Rats, and the city they live in careen between crises and moments of renaissance, Abramovich explores issues of friendship, family, history, and destiny--and looks at what happens when those things fail. Bullies is at once a vivid, visceral narrative of an unusual friendship and an incisive portrait of a beautiful, terrible city"--

    Format: Book - 2016 First edition

    Holds: 0 on 5 copies

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  • The Last Goodnight: A World War II Story of Espionage, Adventure, and Betrayal

    The Last Goodnight: A World War II Story of Espionage, Adventure, and Betrayal

    Blum, Howard

    Time magazine called her "the Mata Hari of Minnesota"; OSS Chief general "Wild Bill" Donovan called her "the greatest unsung heroine of the war." But for decades, the extent of Betty Pack's achievements as an agent during World War II, first for Britain's MI6 and then for America's OSS, remained classified. Now, the truth about this femme fatale--her dangerous liaisons and death-defying missions, the heartaches that haunted her life, her vital contributions to the Allied victory--forms a narrative more thrilling than fiction. Betty Pack was charming, beautiful, and extremely intelligent: these qualities would prove crucial to her success as a spy. It was a vocation she fell into almost by accident, but she turned out to be a consummate professional. Using the code name "Cynthia," she seduced diplomats and military attachu00e9s across the globe in exchange for crucial secrets, but her missions went far beyond the bedroom. She repeatedly risked her life to secure coveted documents, such as the Polish codebooks that proved key to Alan Turing's success with Operation Ultra. Bestselling author Howard Blum masterfully spins Betty's triumphs, the trail of broken hearts she left in her wake, and her brushes with death into a suspenseful saga of wartime espionage.-- Adapted from dust jacket.

    Format: Book - 2016 First edition

    Holds: 0 on 11 copies

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  • The Black Calhouns: From Civil War to Civil Rights, With One African American Family

    The Black Calhouns: From Civil War to Civil Rights, With One African American Family

    Buckley, Gail Lumet

    Gail Lumet Buckley, daughter of actress Lena Horne, delves deeply into her family history, detailing the experiences of an extraordinary African American family from Civil War to civil rights.

    Format: Book - 2016 First edition

    Holds: 1 on 6 copies

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  • The Golden Lad: The Haunting Story of Quentin and Theodore Roosevelt

    The Golden Lad: The Haunting Story of Quentin and Theodore Roosevelt

    Burns, Eric

    Explores the relationship between president Theodore Roosevelt and his youngest and favorite son Quentin, who died in an air fight during the first World War.

    Format: Book - 2016 First Pegasus Books cloth edition

    Holds: 0 on 3 copies

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  • Slow Dancing With A Stranger: Lost and Found in the Age of Alzheimer's

    Slow Dancing With A Stranger: Lost and Found in the Age of Alzheimer's

    Comer, Meryl

    A broadcast journalist and leading Alzheimer's advocate shares her husband's battle with Alzheimer's disease, examining this devastating condition and its effects on the people who have it and those who care for them.

    Format: Book - 2014 First edition

    Holds: 0 on 4 copies

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  • Gamelife: A Memoir

    Gamelife: A Memoir

    Clune, Michael W.

    Format: Book - 2015 First edition

    Holds: 0 on 4 copies

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  • My Avant-garde Education: A Memoir

    My Avant-garde Education: A Memoir

    Cooper, Bernard

    In this lively memoir, art critic and writer Cooper retraces his youth, up to and including the period of his intellectual awakening during the heyday of conceptual art, and vividly recalls his experiences as a son, brother, student, and closeted young gay man. Alternately funny and touching, the book chronicles Cooper's adolescence in 1960s Los Angeles, including the moment he fell in love with pop art in his middle school library, and his young adulthood in New York, where he studied at the School of Visual Arts in New York City, as well as the years he spent studying under the likes of Allan Kaprow and the poet and visual artist Emmett Williams at CalArts. Throughout, Cooper draws interesting connections between his suppressed sexuality and the period's radical reexamination of the art object, observing, "The stronger and more tangible my longing for men, the more adamantly I crusaded for art's dematerialization." Offbeat characters and comic incidents richly animate Cooper's narrative, as do his recollections of compelling seminars and performance pieces at CalArts. Toward the end of the memoir, short chapters offer a glimpse into his career as an art critic and writer, as well as the losses he suffered during the AIDS epidemic. Readers interested in conceptualism will especially value these personal reflections during such a critical moment in the recent history of art.

    Format: Book - 2015 First Edition

    Holds: 0 on 2 copies

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  • Words Without Music: A Memoir

    Words Without Music: A Memoir

    Glass, Philip

    The composer of symphonies, operas, and film scores examines his own life and career.

    Format: Book - 2015 First edition

    Holds: 0 on 10 copies

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  • Romantic Outlaws: The Extraordinary Lives of Mary Wollstonecraft and Her Daughter Mary Shelley

    Romantic Outlaws: The Extraordinary Lives of Mary Wollstonecraft and Her Daughter Mary Shelley

    Gordon, Charlotte

    "Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797) and her daughter Mary Shelley (1797-1851) have each been the subject of numerous biographies by top tier writers, yet no author has ever examined their lives in tandem. Perhaps this is because these two amazing women never knew each other--Wollstonecraft died of infection at the age of 38, a week after giving birth to her daughter. Nevertheless their lives were closely intertwined, their choices, dreams and tragedies so eerily similar, it seems impossible to consider one without the other: both became famous writers; both fell in love with brilliant but impossible authors; both were single mothers and had children out of wedlock (a shocking and self-destructive act in their day); both broke out of the rigid conventions of their era and lived in exile; and both played important roles in the Romantic era during which they lived. The lives of both Marys were nothing less than extraordinary, providing fabulous material for Charlotte Gordon, a gifted story teller. She seamlessly weaves their lives together in back and forth narratives, taking readers on a vivid journey across Revolutionary France and Victorian England, from the Italian seaports to the highlands of Scotland, in a book that reads like a richly textured historical novel"--

    Format: Book - 2015 First U.S. edition

    Holds: 3 on 8 copies

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  • The Pawnbroker's Daughter: A Memoir

    The Pawnbroker's Daughter: A Memoir

    Kumin, Maxine

    "From Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Maxine Kumin, a timeless memoir of life, love, and poetry. Maxine Kumin left an unrivaled legacy as a pioneering poet and feminist. The Pawnbroker's Daughter charts her journey from a childhood in the Jewish community in Depression-era Philadelphia, where Kumin's father was a pawnbroker, to Radcliffe College, where she comes into her own as an intellectual and meets the soldier-turned-Los Alamos scientist who would become her husband; to her metamorphosis from a poet of "light verse" to a "poet of witness"; to her farm in rural New England, the subject and setting of much of her later work. Against all odds, Kumin channels her dissatisfaction with the life that is expected of her as a wife and a mother into her work as a feminist and one of the most renowned and remembered twentieth-century American poets" -- (7/24/2019 2:45:10 AM)

    Format: Book - 2015 First Edition

    Holds: 0 on 4 copies

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