• A message to the West

    A message to the West

    Kunishige, Frank A.

    Frank Asakichi Kunishige was born in Japan on June 5, 1878. He came to the United States via San Francisco in 1895. After graduating from the Illinois College of Photography, he opened a small photography studio in San Francisco. Kunishige moved to Seattle in 1917. In the same year, he married Gin Kunishige and began working in the studio of Edward S. Curtis where he became acquainted with Ella McBride who he worked for in later years. Kunishige was well known for his use of Pictorialism, a popular painterly style of photography. He developed his photographs on "textura tissue," a paper of his own creation, which allowed him to produce almost dreamlike prints. His work was featured nationally and internationally in exhibitions and publications such as Photo-Era and Seattle's Town Crier. In 1924, Kunishige became one of the founding members of the Seattle Camera Club, a group of local photographers including Kyo Koike, Yukio Morinaga, Iwao Matsushita and Fred Y. Ogasawara who gathered to share techniques and ideas, as well as their deep love of the medium. Although the group was initially solely Japanese, they soon welcomed more members including Ella McBride, their first female member. When World War II struck and the country's Japanese internment policy was put in place, Kunishige and his wife were forced to leave Seattle for Idaho where they were interned at the Minidoka camp. After their release, Kunishige spent two years working at a photography studio in Twin Falls, Idaho but eventually returned to Seattle due to his poor health. Frank Kunishige passed away on April 9, 1960.

    Identifier: spl_art_367924_49

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  • Municipal News, v. 53, no. 9, May. 13, 1963

    Municipal News, v. 53, no. 9, May. 13, 1963

    Page 68 article discusses plan for redeveloping downtown Seattle.

    Identifier: spl_mn_818362_53_09

    Date: 1963-05-13

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  • Municipal News, v. 53, no. 10, May. 27, 1963

    Municipal News, v. 53, no. 10, May. 27, 1963

    Identifier: spl_mn_818362_53_10

    Date: 1963-05-27

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  • Municipal News, v. 53, no. 16, Sep. 23, 1963

    Municipal News, v. 53, no. 16, Sep. 23, 1963

    Identifier: spl_mn_818362_53_16

    Date: 1963-09-23

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  • Nude

    Nude

    Kunishige, Frank A.

    Frank Asakichi Kunishige was born in Japan on June 5, 1878. He came to the United States via San Francisco in 1895. After graduating from the Illinois College of Photography, he opened a small photography studio in San Francisco. Kunishige moved to Seattle in 1917. In the same year, he married Gin Kunishige and began working in the studio of Edward S. Curtis where he became acquainted with Ella McBride who he worked for in later years. Kunishige was well known for his use of Pictorialism, a popular painterly style of photography. He developed his photographs on "textura tissue," a paper of his own creation, which allowed him to produce almost dreamlike prints. His work was featured nationally and internationally in exhibitions and publications such as Photo-Era and Seattle's Town Crier. In 1924, Kunishige became one of the founding members of the Seattle Camera Club, a group of local photographers including Kyo Koike, Yukio Morinaga, Iwao Matsushita and Fred Y. Ogasawara who gathered to share techniques and ideas, as well as their deep love of the medium. Although the group was initially solely Japanese, they soon welcomed more members including Ella McBride, their first female member. When World War II struck and the country's Japanese internment policy was put in place, Kunishige and his wife were forced to leave Seattle for Idaho where they were interned at the Minidoka camp. After their release, Kunishige spent two years working at a photography studio in Twin Falls, Idaho but eventually returned to Seattle due to his poor health. Frank Kunishige passed away on April 9, 1960.

    Identifier: spl_art_367924_13

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  • Letter from Arthur Goodwin to Carl F. Kruse regarding his lack of advertising support for Pike Place Market, November 9, 1927

    Letter from Arthur Goodwin to Carl F. Kruse regarding his lack of advertising support for Pike Place Market, November 9, 1927

    Goodwin, Arthur

    Letter from Arthur Goodwin to Carl F. Kruse admonishing him for not advertising in the newspaper for the anniversary of Pike Place Market. Goodwin reminds Kruse that the terms of his lease require that he advertises to the amount of ten percent of his rent. He states 'We notice that you are advertising liberally your other locations, and I want to say quite frankly that we are not at all pleased with your attitude toward the Pike Place Market.'

    Identifier: spl_sh_00099

    Date: 1927-11-09

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  • Municipal News, v. 53, no. 6, Mar. 25, 1963

    Municipal News, v. 53, no. 6, Mar. 25, 1963

    Page 41 article discusses plan for redeveloping downtown Seattle.

    Identifier: spl_mn_818362_53_06

    Date: 1963-03-25

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  • Municipal News v. 55, no. 20, Nov. 22, 1965

    Municipal News v. 55, no. 20, Nov. 22, 1965

    Identifier: spl_mn_818362_55_20

    Date: 1965-11-22

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  • View of regrade north from Madison St. and 3rd Ave., ca. 1906

    View of regrade north from Madison St. and 3rd Ave., ca. 1906

    Webster & Stevens

    Piper and Taft Sporting Goods appears on the left. In the distances is wreckage of what may be the old Washington Hotel. Although the regrade started in 1903, James Moore, the owner of the Washington Hotel, refused to clear the property until 1906 when regrading of Second and Third Avenues were well underway.

    Identifier: spl_dr_018

    Date: 1906

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  • Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, July 11, 1949

    Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, July 11, 1949

    Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952

    Letter from Edward Curtis to Harriet Leitch, apologizing for his slow response and explaining he is deep in his work on "The Lure of Gold." He writes that the size of the project is overwhelming and he is ""praying that I will live long enough to finish the job." Curtis discusses his climbs of Mount Rainier and his friendship with Ella McBride. He notes that she was one of the few women to summit the mountain unassisted and describes her as "my star helper" both in climbs of Mount Rainier and later, as an assistant in his photography studio. He writes that she lived with the Curtis family and was like a second mother to his daughters.

    Identifier: spl_esc_012

    Date: 1949-07-11

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