• Girlhood: Essays

    Girlhood: Essays

    Febos, Melissa

    "When her body began to change at eleven years old, Febos understood immediately that her meaning to other people had changed with it. By her teens, she defined herself based on these perceptions and by the romantic relationships she threw herself into headlong. Over time, Febos increasingly questioned the stories she'd been told about herself and the habits and defenses she'd developed over years of trying to meet others' expectations ... Blending investigative reporting, memoir, and scholarship, Febos charts how she and others like her have reimagined relationships and made room for the anger, grief, power, and pleasure women have long been taught to deny"--Publisher marketing.

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  • Fulfillment: Winning and Losing in One-click America

    Fulfillment: Winning and Losing in One-click America

    MacGillis, Alec

    "The story of regional inequality in America as revealed by the rise of Amazon and its distribution network"--

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  • The New York Times Cooking: No-recipe Recipes

    The New York Times Cooking: No-recipe Recipes

    Sifton, Sam

    Cooking without recipes is a kitchen skill, same as cutting vegetables into dice or flipping an omelet. Sifton makes improvisational cooking easy. Each recipe uses ingredients you have on hand or could pick up on a quick trip to the store. -- Adapted from back cover and page 1.

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  • Dusk, Night, Dawn: On Revival and Courage

    Dusk, Night, Dawn: On Revival and Courage

    Lamott, Anne

    "In Anne Lamott's new book, she confronts the harsh truth that many of us grapple with every day: How can we recapture the confidence we once had in the world and in the future as we stumble through the dark times that seem increasingly bleak? As bad news piles up every day -- from climate crises to threats to democracy to daily assaults on civility -- how can we mere mortals cope? Where, Lamott asks, "do we start to get our joy and hope and our faith in life itself back ... with sore feet, hearing loss, stiff fingers, poor digestion, stunned minds, broken hearts?" We begin, Lamott explains, by accepting our flaws and embracing our humanity "in the here and now. ... We look up and around for [the] brighter ribbons" of connection, loyalty, and support. Drawing from her own experiences and her own faith journey, Lamott offers insights into the intimate and human ways we can bring back hope by demonstrating we can travel through the darkest places toward a more hopeful light that is still burning. As she does in Help, Thanks, Wow and her other bestselling books, Lamott explores the thorny issues of life and faith by breaking them down into manageable, human-sized questions for readers to ponder, and in the process she shows how each of us can amplify life's small moments of joy by staying open to love and connection even in these dark times. As Lamott notes, "I got Medicare three days before I got hitched, which sounds like something an old person might do, which does not describe adorably ageless me." Marrying for the first time with a grown son and a grandson, Lamott explains that finding happiness with a partner isn't a function of age or beauty but of outlook and perspective. Full of the honesty, humor and humanity that have made Lamott beloved by millions of readers, this book is classic Anne Lamott -- thoughtful and comic, warm and wise -- and further proof that Lamott truly speaks to the better angels in all of us"--

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  • Leaving Isn't the Hardest Thing: Essays

    Leaving Isn't the Hardest Thing: Essays

    Hough, Lauren

    "As an adult, Lauren Hough has had many identities: an airman in the U.S. Air Force, a cable guy, a bouncer at a gay club. As a child, however, she had none. Growing up as a member of the infamous cult The Children of God, Hough had her own self robbed from her. The cult took her all over the globe-to Germany, Japan, Texas, Chile-but it wasn't until she finally left for good that Lauren understood she could have a life beyond "The Family." Along the way, she's loaded up her car and started over, trading one life for the next. She's taken pilgrimages to the sights of her youth, been kept in solitary confinement, dated a lot of women, dabbled in drugs, and eventually found herself as what she always wanted to be: a writer. Here, as she sweeps through the underbelly of America-relying on friends, family, and strangers alike-she begins to excavate a new identity even as her past continues to trail her and color her world, relationships, and perceptions of self. At once razor-sharp, profoundly brave, and often very, very funny, the essays in Leaving Isn't the Hardest Thing interrogate our notions of ecstasy, queerness, and what it means to live freely. Each piece is a reckoning: of survival, identity, and how to reclaim one's past when carving out a future"--

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  • Coconut & Sambal: Recipes From My Indonesian Kitchen

    Coconut & Sambal: Recipes From My Indonesian Kitchen

    Lee, Lara

    Beyond Indonesia's lush rainforests, tropical seas and abundant rice fields lies a country not often seen by visitors. It is one of bustling local markets, lively street food stalls, colourful shops and houses and generous community spirit. From these islands comes one of the most diverse cuisines in the world, weaving flavours of lemongrass, chilli, tamarind and coconut into dishes that are fragrant, colourful and bold. Australian-born chef Lara Lee takes us on a journey to trace her family's Indonesian roots, and in the kitchens of her grandmother and extended family, she discovers the secrets to real Indonesian cookery. Now she shares more than 80 authentic, mouth-watering recipes that have been passed down through the generations, so you can recreate dishes such as Nasi goreng, Beef rendang, Chilli prawn satay and Pandan cake. There are also recipes for a variety of sambals: fragrant, spicy relishes - ranging from mild to fiery - that are undoubtedly the heart and soul of every meal. The recipes in Coconut & Sambal use easily accessible ingredients and simple techniques and are interwoven with beguiling tales of life on the islands and vibrant food and travel photography, shining a light on the magnificent but little-known cuisine of Indonesia.

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  • Amazon Unbound: Jeff Bezos and the Invention of A Global Empire

    Amazon Unbound: Jeff Bezos and the Invention of A Global Empire

    Stone, Brad

    'Amazon Unbound' is an unvarnished picture of Amazon's unprecedented growth and its billionaire founder, Jeff Bezos, revealing the most important business story of our time. From the author of 'The Everything Store'.

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  • Hood Feminism: Notes From the Women That A Movement Forgot

    Hood Feminism: Notes From the Women That A Movement Forgot

    Kendall, Mikki

    "A collection of essays taking aim at the legitimacy of the modern feminist movement, arguing that it has chronically failed to address the needs of all but a few women"--

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  • Unsettled Ground: The Whitman Massacre and Its Shifting Legacy in the American West

    Unsettled Ground: The Whitman Massacre and Its Shifting Legacy in the American West

    Tate, Cassandra

    "Historian Cassandra Tate proposes to assemble the story of the Whitman Massacre from the many accounts while including the native point of view to provide a greater context to the event"--

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  • Broken (in the Best Possible Way)

    Broken (in the Best Possible Way)

    Lawson, Jenny

    "As Jenny Lawson's hundreds of thousands of fans know, she suffers from depression. In Broken (in the best possible way), she explores her experimental treatment of transcranial magnetic stimulation with brutal honesty. But also with brutal humor: "People do different things to distract themselves during each treatment. I embroider. It feels fitting. I'm being magnetically stabbed in the head thousands of times as I'm stabbing the embroidery myself. I don't embroider the same patterns my grandmother did. I embroider girls with octopus faces, David Bowie, a flowery bouquet with FUCK YES written in the middle. They let you do anything as long as it's 'positive.'" Jenny discusses the frustration of dealing with her insurance company in "An Open Letter to My Insurance Company," which should be an anthem for anyone who has ever had to call their insurance company to try and get a claim covered. On the lighter side, she tackles such timelessly debated questions as "How do dogs know they have penises?" We see how her vacuum cleaner almost set her house on fire, how she was attacked by three bears, business ideas she wants to pitch to Shark Tank, and why she can never go back to the post office. Of course, Jenny's long-suffering husband Victor-the Ricky to Jenny's Lucille Ball-is present throughout. A treat for Jenny Lawson's already existing fans, and destined to convert new ones, Broken is a beacon of hope and a wellspring of laughter"--

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