• BARRACOON: The Story of the Last "black Cargo"

    BARRACOON: The Story of the Last "black Cargo"

    Hurston, Zora Neale

    In 1927, Zora Neale Hurston went to Plateau, Alabama, just outside Mobile, to interview eighty-six-year-old Cudjo Lewis. Of the millions of men, women, and children transported from Africa to America as slaves, Cudjo was then the only person alive to tell the story of this integral part of the nation's history. Hurston was there to record Cudjo's firsthand account of the raid that led to his capture and bondage fifty years after the Atlantic slave trade was outlawed in the United States.In 1931, Hurston returned to Plateau, the African-centric community three miles from Mobile founded by Cudjo and other former slaves from his ship. Spending more than three months there, she talked in depth with Cudjo about the details of his life. During those weeks, the young writer and the elderly formerly enslaved man ate peaches and watermelon that grew in the backyard and talked about Cudjo's past--memories from his childhood in Africa, the horrors of being captured and held in a barracoon for selection by American slavers, the harrowing experience of the Middle Passage packed with more than 100 other souls aboard the Clotilda, and the years he spent in slavery until the end of the Civil War. Based on those interviews, featuring Cudjo's unique vernacular, and written from Hurston's perspective with the compassion and singular style that have made her one of the preeminent American authors of the twentieth-century, Barracoon masterfully illustrates the tragedy of slavery and of one life forever defined by it. Offering insight into the pernicious legacy that continues to haunt us all, black and white, this poignant and powerful work is an invaluable contribution to our shared history and culture.

    Format: Book - 2018 First edition

    Holds: 7 on 55 copies

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  • The Black Calhouns: From Civil War to Civil Rights, With One African American Family

    The Black Calhouns: From Civil War to Civil Rights, With One African American Family

    Buckley, Gail Lumet

    Gail Lumet Buckley, daughter of actress Lena Horne, delves deeply into her family history, detailing the experiences of an extraordinary African American family from Civil War to civil rights.

    Format: Book - 2016 First edition

    Holds: 1 on 6 copies

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  • Daisy Turner's Kin: An African American Family Saga

    Daisy Turner's Kin: An African American Family Saga

    Beck, Jane C.

    "A daughter of freed African American slaves, Daisy Turner became a living repository of history. The family narrative entrusted to her-- "a well-polished artifact, an heirloom that had been carefully preserved"-- began among the Yoruba in West Africa and continued with her own long lifetime. In 1983, folklorist Jane Beck began to interview Turner, then one hundred years old and still relating four generations of oral history. In her book Daisy Turner's Kin, Beck uses Turner's storytelling to build the Turner family saga, using at its foundation the oft-repeated touchstone stories at the heart of their experiences: the abduction into slavery of Turner's African ancestors; Daisy's father learning to read; his return as a soldier to his former plantation to kill the overseer; Daisy's childhood stand against racism; and her family's life in Vermont. Beck weaves in historical research and offers a folklorist's perspective on oral history and the hazards and uses of memory." -- Page 4 of cover.

    Format: Book - 2015

    Holds: 0 on 2 copies

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  • Dreams of Africa in Alabama: The Slave Ship Clotilda and the Story of the Last Africans Brought to America

    Dreams of Africa in Alabama: The Slave Ship Clotilda and the Story of the Last Africans Brought to America

    Diouf, Sylviane A.

    Format: Book - 2007

    Holds: 1 on 1 copy

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  • In Search of the Promised Land: A Slave Family in the Old South

    In Search of the Promised Land: A Slave Family in the Old South

    Franklin, John Hope

    Format: Book - 2006

    Holds: 0 on 2 copies

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  • Though the Heavens May Fall: The Landmark Trial That Led to the End of Human Slavery

    Though the Heavens May Fall: The Landmark Trial That Led to the End of Human Slavery

    Wise, Steven M.

    Format: Book - 2005

    Holds: 0 on 2 copies

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  • Twelve Years A Slave

    Twelve Years A Slave

    Northup, Solomon

    "A harrowing memoir about one of the darkest periods in American history. Born a free man in New York, Solomon Northup was abducted in Washington, D.C., in 1841 and spent the next twelve years of his life in captivity as a slave on a Louisiana cotton plantation. After his rescue, he published this exceptionally vivid and detailed account of slave life--perhaps the best written of all the slave narratives. It became an immediate bestseller and today is recognized for its unusual insight and eloquence as one of the very few portraits of American slavery produced by someone as educated as Solomon Northup, or by someone with the dual perspective of having been both a free man and a slave"--Provided by publisher.

    Format: Book - 2012

    Holds: 1 on 7 copies

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  • The Two Princes of Calabar: An Eighteenth-century Atlantic Odyssey

    The Two Princes of Calabar: An Eighteenth-century Atlantic Odyssey

    Sparks, Randy J.

    Format: Book - 2004

    Holds: 0 on 2 copies

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  • The Door of No Return: The History of Cape Coast Castle and the Atlantic Slave Trade

    The Door of No Return: The History of Cape Coast Castle and the Atlantic Slave Trade

    St. Clair, William

    Format: Book - 2007

    Holds: 0 on 2 copies

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