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December 17, 2017

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Books, Movies & Music : Washington State Nonfiction

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Washington State Nonfiction

 

A list of nonfiction books set in Washington State. 

 

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Hooverville and the Unemployed: Seattle During the Great Depression

Hooverville and the Unemployed: Seattle During the Great Depression
Gravelle, Randal

What was it like to live in the Hoovervilles of the Great Depression? How were the shacks constructed? What was at the end of a soup kitchen line? Most histories of the Great Depression look at the era from the perspective of the movers and shakers of the time or follow a single person or family. Hooverville and the Unemployed gives a street view of what it was like to live in Seattle during the worst economic collapse in world history. This book also follows the newly unemployed men and women of the era as they tried to pick themselves up and build an organization to feed, clothe and care for one another. Finally, it reveals the pitfalls and successes of President Roosevelt's New Deal programs as seen from the man behind the shovel.


Format: Book
Holds: 0 on 5 copies

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Han in the Upper Left: A Brief History of Korean Americans in the Pacific Northwest

Han in the Upper Left: A Brief History of Korean Americans in the Pacific Northwest


Format: Book
Holds: 0 on 5 copies

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Seattle Memories: The Early Years : A Pictorial History

Seattle Memories: The Early Years : A Pictorial History
Kossen, Bill

Historic photographs of Seattle from the late 1800s through 1939.


Format: Book
Holds: 1 on 28 copies

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Desperate Times: The Summer of 1981

Desperate Times: The Summer of 1981
Masco, Maire

In 1981 a group of Seattle punks decided to publish a newspaper to support the growing punk music scene. The six issue run personify the glory of early 1980's punk attitude, humor, and angry sense of destiny. With a DYI ethic and nothing to loose, Desperate Times was the rag to read in Seattle. Desperate Times is important as a time capsule of the period. It is important historically as the first place the term "grunge" appeared to describe a band. The word "grunge" would in coming years become synonymous with the music of Seattle, and it all started with Desperate Times. All six issues have been digitally scanned and reproduced in glorious black and white. Comprehensive indexes for venues, advertisers, and most importantly, BANDS, make this a required reference for any fan of punk and grunge.


Format: Book
Holds: 0 on 2 copies

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Seattle Totems

Seattle Totems
Obermeyer, Jeff

"Before major-league professional sports came to the Northwest, Seattle had a rich minor-league sports history. In the winter, Saturday afternoons were for college football, but the nights were for hockey. From the late 1950s through the mid-1970s, hockey could only mean one thing--the Seattle Totems. Led by Guyle Fielder, the Totems won three Western Hockey League (WHL) championships as they skated and fought against their rivals. Grab a seat and get ready to learn about Seattle's hockey history from the Seattle Metropolitans, the first American team to win the Stanley Cup, through the Totems as they battle their WHL foes and even the Russian National Team in pursuit of hockey glory."--


Format: Book
Holds: 0 on 4 copies

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Eruption: The Untold Story of Mount St. Helens

Eruption: The Untold Story of Mount St. Helens
Olson, Steve

For months in early 1980, scientists, journalists, sightseers, and nearby residents listened anxiously to rumblings in Mount St. Helens, part of the chain of western volcanoes fueled by the 700-mile-long Cascadia fault. Still, no one was prepared when an immense eruption took the top off of the mountain and laid waste to hundreds of square miles of verdant forests in southwestern Washington State. The eruption was one of the largest in human history, deposited ash in eleven U.S. states and five Canadian providences, and caused more than one billion dollars in damage. It killed fifty-seven people, some as far as thirteen miles away from the volcanou0019s summit. Shedding new light on the cataclysm, author Steve Olson interweaves the history and science behind this event with page-turning accounts of what happened to those who lived and those who died.


Format: Book
Holds: 3 on 31 copies

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Native Peoples of the Olympic Peninsula: Who We Are

Native Peoples of the Olympic Peninsula: Who We Are
Olympic Peninsula Intertribal Cultural Advisory Committee

The nine Native tribes of Washington State's Olympic Peninsula--the Hoh, Skokomish, Squaxin Island, Lower Elwha Klallam, Jamestown S'Klallam, Port Gamble S'Klallam, Quinault, Quileute, and Makah--share complex histories of trade, religion, warfare, and kinship, as well as reverence for the teaching of elders. However, each indigenous nation's relationship to the Olympic Peninsula is unique. Native Peoples of the Olympic Peninsula: Who We Are traces the nine tribes' common history and each tribe's individual story. This second edition is updated to include new developments since the volume's initial publication--especially the removal of the Elwha River dams--thus reflecting the ever-changing environment for the Native peoples of the Olympic Peninsula. Nine essays, researched and written by members of the subject tribes, cover cultural history, contemporary affairs, heritage programs, and tourism information. Edited by anthropologist Jacilee Wray, who also provides the book's introduction, this collection relates the Native peoples' history in their own words and addresses each tribe's current cultural and political issues, from the establishment of community centers to mass canoe journeys. The volume's updated content expands its findings to new audiences. More than 70 photographs and other illustrations, many of which are new to this edition, give further insight into the unique legacy of these groups, moving beyond popular romanticized views of American Indians to portray their lived experiences.


Format: Book
Holds: 0 on 6 copies

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The Sea Is My Country: The Maritime World of the Makahs, An Indigenous Borderlands People

The Sea Is My Country: The Maritime World of the Makahs, An Indigenous Borderlands People
Reid, Joshua L.


Format: Book
Holds: 0 on 6 copies

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Midnight in Broad Daylight: A Japanese American Family Caught Between Two Worlds

Midnight in Broad Daylight: A Japanese American Family Caught Between Two Worlds
Sakamoto, Pamela Rotner

"'Meticulously researched and beautifully written, the true story of a Japanese American family that found itself on opposite sides during World War II--an epic tale of family, separation, divided loyalties, love, reconciliation, loss, and redemption this is a riveting chronicle of U.S.-Japan relations and the Japanese experience in America. After their father's death, Harry, Frank, and Pierce Fukuhara-- all born and raised in the Pacific Northwest-- moved to Hiroshima, their mother's ancestral home. Eager to go back to America, Harry returned in the late 1930s. Then came Pearl Harbor. Harry was sent to an internment camp until a call came for Japanese translators and he dutifully volunteered to serve his country. Back in Hiroshima, his brothers Frank and Pierce became soldiers in the Japanese Imperial Army. As the war raged on, Harry, one of the finest bilingual interpreters in the United States Army, island-hopped across the Pacific, moving ever closer to the enemy-- and to his younger brothers. But before the Fukuharas would have to face each other in battle, the U.S. detonated the atomic bomb over Hiroshima, gravely injuring tens of thousands of civilians, including members of their family. Alternating between the American and Japanese perspectives, Midnight in Broad Daylight captures the uncertainty and intensity of those charged with the fighting as well as the deteriorating home front of Hiroshima-- as never seen before in English-- and provides a fresh look at the dropping of the first atomic bomb. Intimate and evocative, it is an indelible portrait of a resilient family, a scathing examination of racism and xenophobia, an homage to the tremendous Japanese American contribution to the American war effort, and an invaluable addition to the historical record of this extraordinary time; ''Mother, I am Katsuharu. I have come home.' By the time the reader arrives at this simple, Odysseus-like declaration, she will have been tossed and transported through one of the most wrenching, inspirational-- and until now unknown-- true epics of World War II. Pamela Rotner Sakamoto, in her luminous, magisterial re-assembling of the lives of two Japanese brothers who found themselves on opposite sides of the great conflict, has helped shape and set the standard for a vital and necessary new genre: trans-Pacific literature. Her readers will want more'--Ron Powers, Pulitzer Prize Winner and author of Mark Twain : A Life"--


Format: Book
Holds: 3 on 26 copies

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The Gang of Four: Four Leaders. Four Communities. One Friendship

The Gang of Four: Four Leaders. Four Communities. One Friendship
Santos, Bob


Format: Book
Holds: 1 on 7 copies

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