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February 22, 2018

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All Ages : Photography through the Lens of History

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Beyond the Frame: Click! Photography through the Lens of History

 

Learn about the history of photography with these books and videos. This list was created by a librarian at The Seattle Public Library to accompany Beyond the Frame, a year-long commemoration, through programs and exhibits, of the 150th anniversary of the birth of renowned photographer Edward S. Curtis and the history and culture of Native Americans.

 

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Picture Man: The Legacy of Southeast Alaska Photographer Shoki Kayamori

Picture Man: The Legacy of Southeast Alaska Photographer Shoki Kayamori
Thomas, Margaret

"In 1912, Shoki Kayamori and his box camera arrived in a small Tlingit village in southeast Alaska. At a time when Asian immigrants were forbidden to own property and faced intense racial pressure, the Japanese-born Kayamori put down roots and became part of the Yakutat community. For three decades he photographed daily life in the village, turning his lens on locals and migrants alike, and gaining the nickname 'Picture Man.' But as World War II drew near, his passion for photography turned dangerous as government officials called out Kayamori as a potential spy. Despondent, Kayamori committed suicide, leaving behind an enigmatic photographic legacy. In Picture Man, Margaret Thomas views Kayamori's life through multiple lenses. Using Kayamori's original photos, she explores the economic and political realities that sent Kayamori and thousands like him out of Japan toward opportunity and adventure in the United States, especially the Pacific Northwest. She reveals the tensions around Asian immigrants in the West Coast and the racism that sent many young men north to work in the canneries of Alaska. And she illuminates the intersecting--and at times conflicting--lives of villagers and migrants in a time of enormous change. Part history, part biography, part photographic showcase, Picture Man offers a fascinating new view of Alaska history"--


Format: Book
Holds: 0 on 2 copies

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Time Zero: The Last Year of Polaroid Film

Time Zero: The Last Year of Polaroid Film

"TIME ZERO" starts as a eulogy to Polaroid instant film and cameras, sharing with viewers the magic of Polaroid through the perspective of a few Polaroid artists and former employees of the corporation. The documentary chronicles the passionate efforts of a small team who - against all odds - tried to keep instant photography alive


Format: Streaming Video
Holds: 0 on 1 copies

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From Darkroom to Daylight

From Darkroom to Daylight
Wang, Harvey

"From Darkroom to Daylight explores how the dramatic change from film to digital has affected photographers and their work. Harvey Wang interviewed and photographed more than 40 important photographers and prominent figures in the field, including Jerome Liebling, George Tice, Elliott Erwitt, David Goldblatt, Sally Mann, Gregory Crewdson, Susan Meiselas and Eugene Richards, as well as innovators Steven Sasson, who built the first digital camera while at Kodak, and Thomas Knoll, who, along with his brother, created Photoshop. This collection of personal narratives and portraits is both a document of this critical moment and a unique history of photography. Much of Wang's work has been about disappearance--of trades, neighborhoods, ways of life--and to live through this transition in his own craft has enabled him to illuminate the state of the art as both an insider and a documentary photographer."--


Format: Book
Holds: 0 on 2 copies

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Capturing the Light: The Birth of Photography, A True Story of Genius and Rivalry

Capturing the Light: The Birth of Photography, A True Story of Genius and Rivalry
Watson, Roger

"An intimate look at the journeys of two men--a gentleman scientist and a visionary artist--as they struggled to capture the world around them, and in the process invented modern photography. During the 1830s, in an atmosphere of intense scientific enquiry fostered by the industrial revolution, two quite different men--one in France, one in England--developed their own dramatically different photographic processes in total ignorance of each other's work. These two lone geniuses--Henry Fox Talbot in the seclusion of his English country estate at Lacock Abbey and Louis Daguerre in the heart of post-revolutionary Paris--through diligence, disappointment and sheer hard work overcame extraordinary odds to achieve the one thing man had for centuries been trying to do--to solve the ancient puzzle of how to capture the light and in so doing make nature 'paint its own portrait'. With the creation of their two radically different processes--the Daguerreotype and the Talbotype--these two giants of early photography changed the world and how we see it. Drawing on a wide range of original, contemporary sources and featuring plates in colour, sepia and black and white, many of them rare or previously unseen, Capturing the Light charts an extraordinary tale of genius, rivalry and human resourcefulness in the quest to produce the world's first photograph"--


Format: Book
Holds: 0 on 4 copies

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Bystander: A History of Street Photography

Bystander: A History of Street Photography
Westerbeck, Colin

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Format: Book
Holds: 1 on 2 copies

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