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January 21, 2018

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Adults : Criminal Justice Reading List

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Criminal Justice Reading List

 

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A Question of Freedom: A Memoir of Survival, Learning, and Coming of Age in Prison

A Question of Freedom: A Memoir of Survival, Learning, and Coming of Age in Prison
Betts, Reginald Dwayne

At the age of sixteen, R. Dwayne Betts--a good student from a lower-middle-class family--carjacked a man with a friend. He had never held a gun before, but within a matter of minutes he had committed six felonies. In Virginia, carjacking is an offense requiring treatment as an adult. A bright young kid, weighing only 126 pounds, he served his eight-year sentence as part of the adult population in some of the worst prisons in the state. This is his coming-of-age story. Utterly alone--and with the growing realization that he really is not going home any time soon--Dwayne confronts profound questions about violence, freedom, crime, race, and the justice system, and above all, a quest for identity.--From publisher description.


Format: Book
Holds: 0 on 4 copies

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Lockdown

Lockdown
Myers, Walter Dean

Teenage Reese, serving time at a juvenile detention facility, gets a lesson in making it through hard times from an unlikely friend with a harrowing past.


Format: Book
Holds: 0 on 1 copies

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Rikers High

Rikers High
Volponi, Paul

Arrested on a minor offense, a New York City teenager attends high school in the jail facility on Rikers Island, as he waits for his case to go to court.


Format: eBook
Holds: 0 on 1 copies

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Race to Incarcerate: A Graphic Retelling

Race to Incarcerate: A Graphic Retelling
Jones, Sabrina


Format: Graphic Novel
Holds: 0 on 5 copies

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Juvenile in Justice

Juvenile in Justice
Ross, Richard

"...the photographs in Juvenile in Justice open our eyes to the world of the incarceration of American youths. The nearly 150 images in this book were made over 5 years of visiting more than 1,000 youth confined in more than 200 juvenile detention institutions in 31 states. These riveting photographs, accompanied by the life stories that these young people in custody shared with Ross, give voice to imprisoned children from families that have no resources in communities that have no power."--Back cover.


Format: Book
Holds: 0 on 6 copies

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Burning Down the House: The End of Juvenile Prison

Burning Down the House: The End of Juvenile Prison
Bernstein, Nell

"When teenagers scuffle during a basketball game, they are typically benched. But when Will got into it on the court, he and his rival were sprayed in the face at close range by a chemical similar to Mace, denied a shower for twenty-four hours, and then locked in solitary confinement for a month. One in three American children will be arrested by the time they are twenty-three, and many will spend time locked inside horrific detention centers that defy everything we know about how to rehabilitate young offenders. In a clear-eyed indictment of the juvenile justice system run amok, award-winning journalist Nell Bernstein shows that there is no right way to lock up a child. The very act of isolation denies delinquent children the thing that is most essential to their growth and rehabilitation: positive relationships with caring adults. Bernstein introduces us to youth across the nation who have suffered violence and psychological torture at the hands of the state. She presents these youths all as fully realized people, not victims. As they describe in their own voices their fight to maintain their humanity and protect their individuality in environments that would deny both, these young people offer a hopeful alternative to the doomed effort to reform a system that should only be dismantled. Burning Down the House is a clarion call to shut down our nation's brutal and counterproductive juvenile prisons and bring our children home."--


Format: Book
Holds: 0 on 4 copies

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Are Prisons Obsolete?

Are Prisons Obsolete?
Davis, Angela Y.

From the Publisher: Amid rising public concern about the proliferation and privatization of prisons, and their promise of enormous profits, world-renowned author and activist Angela Y. Davis argues for the abolition of the prison system as the dominant way of responding to America's social ills. "In thinking about the possible obsolescence of the prison," Davis writes, "we should ask how it is that so many people could end up in prison without major debates regarding the efficacy of incarceration." Whereas Reagan-era politicians with "tough on crime" stances argued that imprisonment and longer sentences would keep communities free of crime, history has shown that the practice of mass incarceration during that period has had little or no effect on official crime rates: in fact, larger prison populations led not to safer communities but to even larger prison populations. As we make our way into the twenty-first century-two hundred years after the invention of the penitentiary-the question of prison abolition has acquired an unprecedented urgency. Backed by growing numbers of prisons and prisoners, Davis analyzes these institutions in the U.S., arguing that the very future of democracy depends on our ability to develop radical theories and practices that make it possible to plan and fight for a world beyond the prison industrial complex.


Format: Book
Holds: 8 on 4 copies

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Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption
Stevenson, Bryan

The founder of the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama recounts his experiences as a lawyer working to assist those desperately in need, reflecting on his pursuit of the ideal of compassion in American justice.


Format: Book
Holds: 148 on 34 copies

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Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color

Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color
Ritchie, Andrea J.


Format: Book
Holds: 1 on 6 copies

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Resistance Behind Bars: The Struggles of Incarcerated Women

Resistance Behind Bars: The Struggles of Incarcerated Women
Law, Vikki

"In 1974, women imprisoned at New York's maximum-security prison at Bedford Hills staged what is known as the August Rebellion. Protesting the brutal beating of a fellow prisoner, the women fought off guards, holding seven of them hostage, and took over sections of the prison. While many have heard of the 1971 Attica prison uprising, the August Rebellion remains relatively unknown even in activist circles. Resistance Behind Bars is determined to challenge and change such oversights. As it examines daily struggles against appalling prison conditions and injustices, Resistance documents both collective organizing and individual resistance among women incarcerated in the U.S. Emphasizing women's agency in resisting the conditions of their confinement through forming peer education groups, clandestinely arranging ways for children to visit mothers in distant prisons and raising public awareness about their lives, Resistance seeks to spark further discussion and research into the lives of incarcerated women and galvanize much-needed outside support for their struggles."


Format: Book
Holds: 0 on 2 copies

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